Winter Safety

By Julia Brooks and Stacey Cave

February 2021

Having hemophilia A doesn’t mean you can’t get outside and enjoy Canada’s wonderful winters. It’s important to have fun and keep moving, even when the weather is cold and snowy. We put together four videos to help you get the most of winter in a way that’s safe and best suited for you.

Consider Your Options

Consider Your Options

Preparation

Preparation

Equipment

Equipment

Outdoor Safety

Outdoor Safety

About the Authors

Julia Brooks

Julia is a pediatric physiotherapist at the Alberta Children’s Hospital. She received her Bachelor of Medical Rehabilitation, Physical Therapy (BMRPT) in 2003 from the University of Manitoba. She has published on subjects such as Exercise Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Assessment of Joint and Muscle Bleeds, and Standards of Care and Clinical Practice Guidelines for Persons with Hemophilia. She is currently the President of the Canadian Physiotherapists in Hemophilia Care, and on the committee of the Canadian Bleeding Disorders Registry (CBDR), as well as the Parents Empowering Parents committee.

Stacey Cave

Stacey is an adult physiotherapist at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia. She has been working for Providence Health Care since the fall of 2012 in a variety of areas including acute, rehab, outpatients, and geriatrics. Before her hemophilia role, she worked with the Complex Pain Outpatient team where she spent several years developing a pain self-management program with her coworkers. She continues to have an interest in complex pain management in her bleeding disorders role. She graduated from the University of British Columbia’s Master of Physical Therapy program in 2012 and has returned as a clinical instructor with the program to continue to support the MPT students in their learning process. Stacey started with the Adult Bleeding Disorders Program in the fall of 2018. She works three days a week with the program, in conjunction with her other caseload in geriatrics.